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Oct. 2, 2022
schedule
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Right Now at the Zoo

  • 10:00 AM Reptile Chat
  • 10:30 AM Hippo Chat
  • 11:00 AM Panda Keeper Chat
Daily Schedule
grounds map
Entrance/Exit
  • 9:00 AM Gates Open
  • 5:00 PM Last Entry
  • 5:30 PM Gates Close
African Veldt
  • 11:00 AM Giraffe Feeding Adventure (Seasonal, March-October)
  • 1:30 PM Giraffe Keeper Chat
  • 2:00 PM Rhino Keeper Chat
  • 2:30 PM Elephant Feeding & Chat
Animals of the Night
  • 1:00 PM Animals of the Night Keeper Chat
Aquarium
  • 3:00 PM Aquarium Keeper Chat
Cat Country
  • 1:30 PM Cat Country Chat
China
  • 11:00 AM Panda Keeper Chat
Dragon's Lair
  • No Events found.
Herpetarium
  • 10:00 AM Reptile Chat
Northwest Passage
  • 11:00 AM Sea Lion Show
  • 2:00 PM Polar Bear Chat
  • 3:00 PM Sea Lion Show
Once Upon a Farm
  • No Events found.
Pelican Pool
  • No Events found.
Penguin Rock
  • 3:00 PM Penguin Feeding
Primate Canyon
  • 1:15 PM Primate Keeper Chat
Teton Trek
  • 1:00 PM Bear feeding
Tropical Bird House
  • 2:00 PM Tropical Bird Feeding
Zambezi River Hippo Camp
  • 10:30 AM Hippo Chat
placeZoo Map
Experience Packages Dining Options Membership Discounts
family walking family_restroomFamily Accommodations

Your Passport to

Teton Trek

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Black Bears

Black bears are not always black. In fact, their fur color varies based on age and the time of the year. The fur of black bears can range from dark variations, such as dark brown and light black, to light variations, such as blonde or cinnamon. In fact, some bears have fur that’s bluish white. Completely white bears are called spirit bears by Northwest Pacific Indians.

About the Memphis Zoo black bears

We have three black bears, “River,” “Spring” and “Fire.” River is the male of the group, and is the largest of the three. Spring is his sister, and has a solid black coat. Our third bear, Fire, once had cinnamon-colored fur, but as she’s gotten older, it’s turned black. In the sunlight, you can still catch glimpses of her original reddish color. We’ve had black bears in our collection since 2002.

Quick Facts

Quick Facts

Black bears inadvertently helped name a now-famous children’s toy. President Theodore Roosevelt, while on a black bear hunt in Mississippi, refused to shoot an old black bear. Word spread, and on November 16, 1902, a cartoon appeared in The Washington Post. A New York shop owner, Morris Michtom, saw the cartoon and displayed two stuffed bears his wife had made in his shop’s window. He asked Roosevelt’s permission to call them Teddy’s bears, and the name stuck.

Quick Facts

They love their food! In late summer and early fall, a male can gain up to 30 lbs. in a single week to prepare for hibernation.

Quick Facts

They’re true omnivores. While they will eat meat, up to 75% of their diet in the wild is plant-based.

Quick Facts

Black bears are found throughout North America. In fact, they are found in 32 states in the U.S., all but one of the Canadian provinces, and five Mexican states.

Quick Facts

It all started with a bear named "Natch" in 1906. The first inhabitant of the newly-formed Zoo was a black bear.

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Trumpeter Swans

Trumpeter swans received their name because of the loud, trumpeting call that sounds much like a honk. These large, graceful birds were once close to extinction, but thanks to many reintroduction programs across the country, this species is seeing some recovery.

About the Memphis Zoo's Trumpeter Swans

A pair of swans now live in Teton Trek. Both came from Utah’s Hogle Zoo, but they actually hatched in Iowa. The Zoo has a rich history of swans in its collection, dating back to 1966. The Zoo is very involved in a reintroduction program for trumpeter swans across the country.

Click here to read more about the Zoo’s work with swans both here and in the wild.

Quick Facts

Status

Least Concern

Range

Western regions of North America

Diet

Trumpeter Swans primarily feed on seeds, plants and small insects.

Distinguishing Characteristics

Well-known for their large size, white feathers and black beak.

Size

The largest species of North American waterfowl, they can weigh up to 30 lbs.

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Timber Wolves

The wolf is what is referred to as an apex predator, an animal at the top of the food chain. Living in packs of four to 40, wolves prefer to hunt large mammals — deer, moose and caribou. They regularly eat birds, rodents and rabbits as well. Their top speed is near 40 miles per hour, and they have been reported to execute a running broad jump of well over 20 feet. Timber wolves are also referred to as gray wolves.

About our Wolves

We are home to two wolves: Dakota and Meeka. Dakota is the tallest of the two and has noticeable “tear stains” under his eyes. He is the alpha male of the pack. Meeka is the alpha female of the group, and she is distinguished by her under-bite. The wolves both share a birthday on April 9, 2009, and have been a part of our zoo family since they were pups. They are always interested in the visitors overlooking their exhibit and are very playful with each other.

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Grizzly Bears

The Grizzly Bear is a distinctive subspecies of the Brown Bear which once was found practically all across the Northern Hemisphere. Other subspecies include the Kodiak, Hokkaido and Eurasian Brown Bears. Grizzlies are not true hibernators, but rather enter a "winter sleep" during which their metabolism slows and they survive on accumulated fat but not to the extent of true hibernators.

About our Grizzlies

Memphis Zoo is home to three grizzly bears: Cochise, Yukon and ElseThree grizzlies reside at the Memphis Zoo’s Teton Trek exhibit. These large bears are  “Cochise,” “Else” and “Yukon,” three siblings rescued from the wild when their mother was killed. Yukon is the largest by weight, but not as full looking as Cochise. Else is our only female is she is much smaller than her brothers.

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Elk

Elk are very majestic animals sometimes mistaken for caribou. They are abundant in Yellowstone National Park and the Pacific Northwest. Elk live in herds in and around forested habitat and feed on plants, leaves, grasses and tree bark. Elk are the most vocal of deer. In autumn, the bulls call out challenges to rivals, known as bugling.

About our Elk

Teton is home to 5 elk. "Big John" is our only boy, and most of the year he can easily be spotted by the rack of antlers on his head. Male elk naturally shed their antlers ever spring. Every year they get slightly larger and more impressive. The four females are "Helena,"  "Charisa," "Summer" and "Maggie." Summer and Maggie are the youngest and were born in Memphis.

Quick Facts

Status

Listed as “least concern” with an increasing population

Range

These are found in western US and Canada.

Diet

Elk are herbivores and primarily feed on grass and browse.

Distinguishing Characteristics

Elk have brown fur, lighter on underside, tail and rump. The males’ antlers have six tines (points) that can be up to 5 feet across.

Size

These large males can weigh up to 800 lbs, and even females can get as large as 500 lbs.

Accommodates

 up to 400 (banquet seating for 152). “Perfect for”, “amenities”, and “pricing” is good. Includes: 150 chairs, 19 60” round tables, and 10 cabaret tables.